publications

Electrophysiological Measurements and Analysis of Nociception in Human Infants

JoVE

Earlier this evening, the latest of PiPA group’s articles was published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

This technical journal article describes the methods behind our ‘time-locking’ techniques.

Citation: 

Fabrizi L, Worley A, Patten D, Cornelissen L, Meek J, Boyd S & Slater R (2011) Electrophysiological measurements and analysis of nociception in human infantsJoVE.

Abstract:

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. Since infants cannot verbally report their experiences, current methods of pain assessment are based on behavioural and physiological body reactions, such as crying, body movements or changes in facial expression. While these measures demonstrate that infants mount a response following noxious stimulation, they are limited: they are based on activation of subcortical somatic and autonomic motor pathways that may not be reliably linked to central sensory processing in the brain. Knowledge of how the central nervous system responds to noxious events could provide an insight to how nociceptive information and pain is processed in newborns.

The heel lancing procedure used to extract blood from hospitalised infants offers a unique opportunity to study pain in infancy. In this video we describe how electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) time-locked to this procedure can be used to investigate nociceptive activity in the brain and spinal cord.

This integrative approach to the measurement of infant pain has the potential to pave the way for an effective and sensitive clinical measurement tool.

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